To Be Everywhere Is to Be Nowhere

To Be Everywhere Is to Be Nowhere

“If you build it, they will come.” is a famous quote from 1989 film “Field of Dreams”, but this is certainly not the case when it comes to running a website. I started this website in September 2014, but even after 2.5 years, the traffic still remains pretty low.

Not Humanly Possible to “Be Everywhere and Equally Active”

This is partly because of me not making much effort to get my website noticed as Tumblr remains the only active social networking account to promote this website. Sometimes I’m tempted to adopt “be everywhere” strategy by setting up more social networking accounts, as being at more places increases my chance to be found by more people. But, it’s not humanly possible to “be everywhere and equally active”. For me as a perfectionist, I hate to spread myself too thin.

Furthermore, trying to be everywhere surely takes much more time and energy out of me. Uploading the same photos to many different places is burdensome and time-consuming. I know that there is a way to automate the process, e.g. posting a photo on Flickr automatically gets it posted on Tumblr, then gets shared on Facebook and Twitter, etc.

More Fitting to Say “to Be Everywhere Is to Be Nowhere”

But, is this really called “be everywhere” without me being on those platforms and interacting with real people? For me, it’s more fitting to say “to be everywhere is to be nowhere”. At the end of the day, my website isn’t a business, it’s a hobby, for fun. While I’d love to reach more people, there is no imminent need to desperately seek traffic by setting up more social networking accounts than I can manage.

Last but not least, “be everywhere” goes against my minimalistic approach to life in general. As we all know, Everything You Own Keeps You Busy, and this is certainly the case with social networking accounts, too.

Focusing on Writing Good Contents on My Own Website

So, going forward, I’ll continue being focused on writing good contents on my own website rather than spending my efforts elsewhere, and try to add value to those who are interested in twilight and dusk photography cos people are intrinsically wired to share value with others. And this way, I’m hoping more people will “discover” my website in the years to come.

The one thing I’m sure is that I’ll keep posting photos and tips on this website as long as I’m alive. So, time is on my side. And, before I’m gone, I’ll ask my son to take care of this website and make sure that he’ll renew web hosting every year so that my website will never die even if I’m gone. LoL!

Everything You Own Keeps You Busy: Why I Own Only Two Lenses

Everything You Own Keeps You Busy: Why I Own Only Two Lenses

For enthusiast photographers, it may be quite rare to own only two lenses like I do. Shooting cityscapes exclusively (or rather “narrow-mindedly”), all I need is Nikon 18-35mm (f/3.5-4.5) that I use more than 90% of the time and Nikon 14mm (f/2.8) that caters for situations where 18mm isn’t quite wide enough.

Sometimes my photographers friends are surprised that I own “only” two lenses, but if anything, I feel very good about owning less, as it lets me feel lighter and a little freer, too.

Off topic, but I’ve long applied this minimalistic approach to non photography part of my life and own very few things, which has allowed me to stay away from the stress caused by owning excess stuff. We all know that everything you own keeps you busy, or as Tyler Durden from Fight Club (1999) says, “The things you own end up owning you.”. Looking back, these are very true…

Everything I own today has been brought into my life deliberately and adds real value, like the “only” two lenses I own, Nikon 18-35mm and Nikon 14mm being an essential part of my cityscape photography at twilight and dusk.

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